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Below are a number of posts containing useful tips and insights from the Directors of Auxil Limited, acknowledged industry experts and trusted advisors in the fields of Health & Safety and Human Resources, which will hopefully trigger some thoughts or ideas. 
 
Why not join the conversation? We would love to hear your views… 

Posts tagged “Construction Safety”

Most employers throughout the UK understand, more than ever, how important the Health and Safety of their workforce is, with this in mind our focus this month is on health and safety training and why it is important. 
In the first instance, it is a legal requirement that employees are competent to undertake required tasks in a safe way. The Health and Safety at Work etc. Act (HSWA) 1974 states that employers need to provide whatever information, instruction, training and supervision is necessary to ensure, "so far as is reasonably practicable", the safety of their employees and others affected by their activities. 
 
The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations (MHSWR) 1999, outlines where safety training is most important, e.g. when people start work, on exposure to new or increased risks and update skills and knowledge where needed. The MHSWR require employees to consider the capabilities, training, knowledge and experience of workers and ensure that the demands of their work do not exceed their ability to carry out their role without risk to themselves and others. 
CDM stands for Construction Design and Management Regulations 2015 and not Cadbury’s Dairy Milk! 
CDM 2015 applies to all construction work which means the carrying out of any building, civil engineering or engineering construction work. 
Who are the duty Holders under the CDM 2015 regulations? 
1. Clients are organisations or individuals for whom a commercial construction project is carried out and have control of the decisions relating to the build. They must; 
a. Appoint a Principal Designer and Principal Contractor in writing or accept their duties themselves and assess their competence; 
b. ensure an F10 notification is submitted to the HSE, if the project is over 500 person days or over 30 days with more than 20 persons on site at any one time; 
c. Ensure suitable welfare facilities are in place from day 1 of construction 
d. provide Pre-Construction Information (PCI) to every designer and contractor appointed 
e. before the construction phase begins, a Construction Phase Plan (CPP) is in place 
f. a Health and Safety File for the project is prepared when construction is complete 
Construction company, Sir Robert McAlpine Ltd was sentenced for safety breaches after worker, Mark Smith, fell 4.8 metres via an unprotected opening. 
Leeds Magistrates’ Court heard how, on 28 April 2016, Mr Smith, aged 36, was working at Stone Gappe Hall, Lothersdale, Keighley, owned by Richard McAlpine, a director of the McAlpine team of companies. Mr Smith was attaching straps to a water tank while preparing to pass it to a decrease flooring of a water tower at the property, in order to paint the floor. 
 
An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) observed that Mr Smith fell through an opening that did not have fixed aspect protection. As a result, he sustained serious injuries including: a tibial shaft fracture, a distal fibular fracture, a fracture to the left patella, orbital and nasal fractures, lacerations to the face, a concessional head injury, damage to his ribs and he was hospitalised for 9 days.  
 
This month, we are taking a look at recent news. 
An article published by hsmsearch.com shows that “a solar panel company has been fined after a worker fell through a skylight during the installation of solar panels on a farm workshop in East Sussex.” 
On July 23rd 2018 Brighton Magistrates Court heard how an employee of SolarUK Limited fell approximately four meters through a unprotected skylight, sustaining multiple long term injuries to his wrist; whilst carrying out insulation work in Ninfield. The court heard as he stood to move he stepped onto the unprotected rooflight. An investigation by the HSE found that, although the company were aware of the risks from fragile surfaces and unprotected edges, they failed to plan or properly supervise the work, failing to ensure that access to hazardous areas were prevented; thus showing that all the workers were at risk of falls throughout the job. 
 
SolarUK Limited, pleaded guilty to breaching Regulation 4(1) of The Working at Height Regulations 2005 and were fined £40,000 and ordered to pay an additional £2,170 to cover costs and a victim surcharge. 
Milestones are great, especially for businesses. It means you’ve achieved a goal and something’s going right. 
This month we are celebrating a very special milestone as we are turning 5 years old, and we wanted to mark this occasion with a blogpost dedicated to how we have grown from a small idea to the thriving local business we are today. 
 
The thing with starting your own business is that you literally don’t know what you don’t know. It’s easy to head off, all gung-ho, into the entrepreneurial world but sticking at it through good times and the tough times takes strength and determination about your business’s potential success. Its hours of hard work! 
From a one-man band to a team of dedicated consultants, Auxil Ltd has come leaps and bounds from where we began. But we couldn’t have got to where we are today without you, our customers. 
CHAS (Contractors Health and Safety Assessment Scheme) was created by experienced Health & Safety professionals in 1997 to improve the Health & Safety standards in the UK. 
CHAS was created to achieve; simple Health & Safety contractor assessments, by standardising requirements, to allow companies to avoid undergoing Health & Safety assessments for every job. 
CHAS undergoes an annual audit to achieve and maintain the HSE’s SSIP Standard. 
 
What Is CHAS Accreditation? 
The most basic CHAS Accreditation is completed with a main Health & Safety assessment, complete with four additional SELF-CERTIFIED question sets.Health & Safety – Assessment; The assessment is carried out by one of their qualified assessors, so you can be assured that any assessment is being carried out by an assessor with the appropriate knowledge base. 
The festive season is finally here, and many sites are closing to celebrate Christmas through to the new year. But before you leave to enjoy the festivities and a well-earned break, there are a few things you need to get into order. 
Even when your site is inactive, you still hold a duty of care, in order to keep the general public safe. 
This checklist will help you minimise any risks posed during the break by ensuring your site is as secure as possible, during your time away: 
Check your fencing 
You need to define your site boundaries, with the use of suitable fencing; this should reflect the nature of the site and the surrounding areas. Take a quick walk round your site to ensure that fencing is secure and undamaged. Children (and thieves) will often enter construction sites during quiet periods, and the best way to keep them safe from injury is to keep them out. 
 
What is SMAS? 
SMAS is short for Safety Management Advisory Services. 
They are a Health & Safety assessment organisation that offers a nationally recognised Health & Safety accreditation used to demonstrate your business' Health and Safety standards. They are a co-founding member of the Safety Schemes in Procurement or better known as SSIP. 
 
All of the assessments are undertaken in-house which enable SMAS to offer a consistent standard across all assessments, the minimum standards SMAS assess against are set out in the SSIP Core Criteria.. 
Contractor pays £566,670 for line strike with no injury 
 
A construction contractor has been fined £566,670 after a tipper truck driven by one of its employees struck overhead power lines. The vehicle sustained minor damage and the driver was unhurt. 
 
The driver was employed by Mick George, a company that supplies earth moving, demolition, skip hire and waste management services to the construction industry.  
 
On 9 March 2016 he was emptying a load of soil from the tipper at a construction site in Northampton.  
 
He drove forward with the dump bed still raised and touched – or almost touched – the 33kV overhead power lines. 
You may be aware that working at height is one of the biggest factors in the fatalities and injuries that take place in the workplace. Common accidents are falling from height or falling through fragile surfaces. 
 
Here are some sensible do's and don’ts to combat the potential hazards. 

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