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Below are a number of posts containing useful tips and insights from the Directors of Auxil Limited, acknowledged industry experts and trusted advisors in the fields of Health & Safety and Human Resources, which will hopefully trigger some thoughts or ideas. 
 
Why not join the conversation? We would love to hear your views… 

Posts tagged “Health and Safety”

The HSE website states that “There is other legislation governing the proper disposal of waste, ranging from low-risk waste through to hazardous waste. These laws are enforced by the Environment Agency and Local Authorities. 
 
However, all waste produced can also present a real safety hazard to workers if it is not properly managed throughout the project.” 
 
Managers/supervisors therefore need to decide: 
 
How waste produced during building work will be managed; and 
 
Who is responsible for collecting and disposal of waste? Problems arise when company and individual duties are not made clear before work starts. 
 
Top tips for waste management on smaller projects: 
 
Flammable materials - make sure that all flammable waste (such as boxes, packaging and timber offcuts) are cleared away regularly to reduce fire risks; 
Work areas - make clearing waste a priority. Check that everyone is aware of what is required and that it is completed; 
The HSE website has identified an incident where “Two West Yorkshire businesses, Brighouse Pallet Services Ltd and Seal It Services Ltd, have been fined for safety breaches after a HGV driver suffered a fracture to one of his neck vertebrae. 
Leeds Magistrates’ Court heard that on 5 August 2020 the delivery driver, an employee of Brighouse Pallet Services Ltd was struck by one or two falling pallets whilst they were being unloaded from a HGV trailer by a Seal It Services Ltd fork-lift truck (FLT) operator at the latter company’s site at Elland. 
 
An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that both companies failed in their duty to provide a safe system of work. They failed to put in place simple control measures to ensure that all delivery drivers who visited the Seal It Services Ltd site were moved to a safe location for waiting, whilst HGV trailers were being unloaded by FLTs. 
 
Seal It Services Ltd of Riverbank Way, Elland, West Yorkshire, pleaded guilty to breaching Section 3(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974. The company was fined £50,000 and ordered to pay £4,654.90 in costs.” 
If you own or run a construction company, you will no doubt be aware of the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015 (CDM 2015). Our blog this month provides clarity on the basics of what you need to know. 
 
According to the HSE “a principal contractor (PC) is the contractor with control over the construction phase of a project involving more than one contractor. They are appointed as early as possible by the client (commercial or domestic), before construction starts, to plan, manage, monitor and coordinate health and safety during this phase”. 
 
A principal contractor cooperates closely with the client and the principal designer and influences how the risks to health and safety are managed during the construction project. The PC ensures that requirements are understood and implemented. To do this the PC should: 
Principal contractor in Greater Manchester sentenced for putting lives at risk. 
The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has prosecuted a principal contractor for failing to safely manage a large, deep excavation during the construction of a dwelling in Greater Manchester. The defendant was Mr Matib of Bradford who was sentenced to sixteen weeks imprisonment suspended for twelve months, ordered to carry out 200 hours unpaid work and pay costs of £5,673. 
 
The inspectors reported that Mr Matib, who had employed several groundworkers, was found to have supervised unsafe excavation which put workers at risk and rendered the neighbouring property unstable. 
 
In addition, the defendant had failed to prepare a construction phase plan, with risk assessments and method statements, failed to appoint a site manager with suitable skills, knowledge and experience to manage the work. 
On 6 April 2022 the Personal Protective Equipment at Work (Amendment) Regulations 2022 (PPER 2022) will come into force. The updated regulations extend PPE duties to include the free of charge provision of PPE to workers not just employees. 
The regulations stated that if a risk assessment indicates that PPE is required, employers must ensure their workers have sufficient information, instruction, and training on the use of PPE. Workers have a duty to use the PPE in accordance with their training and instruction, and ensure it is returned. The employer will be responsible for the maintenance, storage and replacement of any PPE they provide. 
 
Worker means ‘an individual who has entered into or works under; 
(a) a contract of employment; or 
(b) any other contract, whether express or implied and (if it is express) whether oral or in writing, whereby the individual undertakes to do or perform personally any work or services for another party to the contract whose status is not by virtue of the contract that of a client or customer of any profession or business undertaking carried on by the individual. 
Employers need to ensure suitable PPE is:  
provided 
compatible 
maintained 
correctly stored 
used properly 
 
Ensuring the health and safety of employees has always been important for business owners, with this in mind we have put together information to help to manage your health and safety. 
The Health and Safety Information for Employees Regulations 1989, requires employers to either display the HSE-approved law poster or to provide each of their workers with the equivalent leaflet. 
 
If an employer chooses to use the Health and Safety Law poster to communicate with their employees, they should consider two things; the location of the poster or leaflet and the quantity that they display. 
 
HSE- approved law posters must be displayed in a prominent location in all business sites; in an area that can be easily accessed by employees; this could be in places like break rooms, kitchens, reception areas and communal spaces, ensuring they are clearly visible. 
As the construction industry starts to become somewhat normal again across the UK, Building will resume, however a lot more building’s will be gracing the sky rather than stretching across the way. 
According to a report by New London Architecture, there are 525 new planned high-rise buildings with 20+ floors, for London alone. 
This will increase the problem Health and Safety professionals face and how to consistently operate safe workings at height. 
 
So, what is working at height? 
According to the HSE, working at height is defined as; work in any place where, if precautions were not taken, a person could fall a distance liable to cause personal injury. 
You are working at height if you: 
• work above ground/floor level 
• could fall from an edge, through an opening or fragile surface or 
• could fall from ground level into an opening in a floor or a hole in the ground 
According to the HSE (in their Asbestos Related Diseases Statistics published in November 2020) over 5,000 deaths per year are being caused by Asbestos-related diseases, including mesothelioma, lung cancer and asbestosis. 
What is Asbestos? 
Asbestos is a mineral that was mined for and used heavily in the construction/manufacturing industry following World War II, largely used in insulation, and building materials. This was due to its properties such as being a good thermal insulator, a good electrical insulator, minimal chemical reactions as well as being relatively fireproof. All these attributed made asbestos one of the best building materials. The only downside to Asbestos which was not widely known at the time was that once these Asbestos containing material are broken, the fibres they release are deadly once breathed in. 
What makes Asbestos so dangerous? 
When Asbestos containing materials or ACMs are broken or start to break-down they release exceedingly small fibres into the air, some looks like string others look like needles. 
CDM stands for Construction Design and Management Regulations 2015 and not Cadbury’s Dairy Milk! 
CDM 2015 applies to all construction work which means the carrying out of any building, civil engineering or engineering construction work. 
Who are the duty Holders under the CDM 2015 regulations? 
1. Clients are organisations or individuals for whom a commercial construction project is carried out and have control of the decisions relating to the build. They must; 
a. Appoint a Principal Designer and Principal Contractor in writing or accept their duties themselves and assess their competence; 
b. ensure an F10 notification is submitted to the HSE, if the project is over 500 person days or over 30 days with more than 20 persons on site at any one time; 
c. Ensure suitable welfare facilities are in place from day 1 of construction 
d. provide Pre-Construction Information (PCI) to every designer and contractor appointed 
e. before the construction phase begins, a Construction Phase Plan (CPP) is in place 
f. a Health and Safety File for the project is prepared when construction is complete 
Working safely during the coronavirus pandemic has been and is at the forefront of business owners’ minds. To enable businesses to return to work, following the latest information from HM Government, employers are required to produce a risk assessment. 
 
To help, we have listed below the requirements employers must consider when producing their Covid-19 Risk Assessment: 
1. Are your employees fit to come to work or are their immediate family are infected or vulnerable, 
2. Should they be isolated, 
3. What happens if they show symptoms at work, 
4. Can your employees work from home and use technology 
5. Can you stagger shifts to reduce numbers at premises at any one time 
6. How are your employees getting to work, driving, using public transport, cycling or walking 
7. How are they signing in and out safely 
8. How is social distancing being managed within the workplace, 2m spacing, and moving around the workplace 
9. Use of desks, workstations, people in shared rooms or using shared working platforms. 
 

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